CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, In The Kitchen Part 2, July 16, 2018

July 16

In the kitchen part two

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about in the kitchen.

This is part two.  You can read part one for the week of July 09.

 

IN THE KITCHEN        part two

 

Stoves, thermostat controls, washing machines, and other household appliances with dials can be marked with small strips of colored electrical tape (several layers make it easier to feel), small strips of colored or clear embossing (demo) tape,

Locator Dots (available from CNIB) or by filing notches.  Only mark essential numbers to avoid a cluttered dial.  For example, put a piece(s) of bright colored contrasting tape on the oven dial at the twelve o’clock (top) position when the oven is off.  Put another piece(s) of tape on the stove where the 350  is.  When you turn the dial and match or line up the two pieces of tape, you will have a 350

or moderate oven. You will easily be able to judge temperatures above and below this point.

 

A wooden spoon or wooden rack puller (which doesn’t conduct heat) can be used to locate a hot oven rack, a dish on the rack, or to pull out the rack.

 

When reaching into the oven, prevent burns by wearing long flame-resistant oven mitts which extend to your elbow.  (These are available from the CNIB)

 

Before removing a casserole or baking dish from the oven, make sure the oven door is completely open and the rack pulled all the way out.

 

If you suspect a casserole or baking dish may boil over or splatter while in the oven, place a cookie sheet underneath to catch the spills.  It is easier to clean than the whole oven.

 

Use large print or raised dot (braille) timers as a guide to know when food is cooked.

You can also use other types of timers. You can also judge the readiness of food by using a combination of sensory clues – touch, smell, hearing, taste or remaining vision.

 

A muffin tin is ideal for baking potatoes, stuffed peppers, or tomatoes.  It is easier to locate and remove a muffin tin than several items scattered on the oven rack.

 

For even proportions of mashed potatoes and turnip, use an ice cream scoop.  A scoop is also useful for making muffins, cupcakes, etc., because it allows you to get equal amounts of batter in each section and is easier than pouring directly from a bowl or using a spoon.  Use a small ice cream scoop to make cookies.

 

To spread peanut butter, or other hard-to-spread foods, use a small narrow spatula.

 

Use a tray or cookie sheet to organize utensils and ingredients when cooking.  A tray catches any spills, making clean-up easier, and ensures small items are not misplaced.

 

Use measuring cups in graduated sizes (available in department stores and from Tupperware), rather than a one cup measure with small dividing lines marked in print.

 

To measure a portion of a block of butter or shortening, use a plastic stick which has notches cut for 1/4 cup, etc.

 

When measuring herbs and spices, sprinkle into the palm of your hand first so you are able to determine how much you are using.  This will prevent accidentally adding too much to a dish.

 

Measuring small amounts of liquid such as 1 tsp. vanilla is difficult.  Dipping is easier than pouring into a spoon.  You may find it beneficial to transfer liquids you use often into wide mouth containers for easy dipping.  Large eye droppers or a small plastic syringe are also great for measuring extracts, flavorings, and colorings.

 

To separate egg whites from yolks use an egg separator or small funnel (both available in department stores).  Or, break the egg into the palm of your hand and let the egg white run through your spread fingers.  The yolk will remain in your hand.

 

Fill a large salt shaker full of flour for dusting baking pans, making gravies, etc.  It isn’t messy and saves flour.

 

A canning funnel is helpful when pouring liquids into narrow-mouth containers.  Square-topped funnels are easier to use.

 

Place a jar lid, pebbles, or marbles in the bottom of your double boiler or kettle.  The rattling sound will signal if the water has boiled away.

 

Prevent ants, flour beetles, or other pests from invading your cupboards by leaving sage or bay leaves on food shelves.

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

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CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, In The Kitchen Part 1, July 9, 2018

July 09

In the kitchen part one

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about in the kitchen.

This is part one.

 

IN THE KITCHEN

 

Hang most used pots and utensils from a wooden strip or                 pegboard on a wall or cabinet to easily locate.

 

When storing canned products such as fruits, vegetables and soups, reserve a shelf or a section of the shelf for each food group. The food most used                                    (soup for example) may be placed in the most convenient-to-reach location and the remaining cans arranged in alphabetical order according to their contents.

 

Extra shelving wide enough to accommodate one row of canned, bottled, or packaged goods eliminates the need to conduct extensive searches for items. Shelves can be installed on any convenient wall in the kitchen or basement, on the back of a door, in a closet or pantry. Attaching labels to shelf edges will help eliminate the need to label individual products.

 

Shelves can be sectioned off with a plastic straw laid horizontally and glued or taped into position. Strips of wood or dowels can be used for the same purpose.  Use easily recognized items as dividers (for example large bottles of mayo or ketchup) to separate canned goods of a similar size.

 

A variety of plastic trays and adjustable drawer dividers are available in hardware and department stores.

 

Canned products, baking products, etc., can be organized in different ways:  according to frequency of use, in alphabetical order, or into categories used.  For example, spices may be divided into two groups – those used for baking (cinnamon, nutmeg, etc.) and those used in main dishes (garlic, celery seed, etc.).

 

To help you find what you are looking for in your freezer try grouping foods of a similar type – fish, vegetables, or meats for example – into larger bags which you can take out while you find the particular packet you want.  If you have some color perception, differently colored labels and tags or colored bags may help.

 

A simple way to distinguish between a small number of identical containers such as cans, bottles, or salt and pepper shakers is to put an elastic band around one of them.  Alternately, select brands so that no two items are in identical containers.

 

Use large print or braille to make labels for spices, etc.  When a bottle is empty, you simply transfer the new item to the old bottle to avoid having to make new labels.  If the name can be shortened so that the label can be put on the lid of the container, you only need to change the lids.

 

 

Use a variety of materials and techniques.  There is no one material or technique that covers every labelling need. You may elect to use some or all of the methods described here, and even invent some new ones.

 

 

Do not be obsessed with labelling!  Among your food items and household supplies there are a number of items easily recognized by the touch, shake, or smell method.  These need not be marked.  Good organization in storing canned and packaged products, as well as personal items, and keeping everything in its place will significantly cut down your need for labelling.  Label only those things that cannot be distinguished by any other convenient means and keep any labels as short and concise as possible.

 

People who are visually impaired hould take advantage of colour contrasts. Work with dark ingredients on a light-coloured counter top or cutting board. Work with light ingredients on a dark surface.

 

Remove the eyes from potatoes with point of peeler or knife before peeling.

 

It is easier to determine if the peel on vegetables has all been removed when the vegetable is wet.  The portion of the vegetable that has the peel remaining on it will have a rough texture, while the portion peeled will have a smooth, moist texture.

 

Keep fingers curled in and downward while chopping vegetables, etc.  To gauge the thickness of a slice, put the blade of a sharp pointed knife by the forefinger of the hand that is holding the vegetable, then move knife and forefinger the required distance before cutting.  Some vegetables ( for example turnips ) should be cut in half  and placed flat side down on the chopping board before cutting into slices.  The Magna Wonder Knife (available from CNIB) has an adjustable slicing guide that makes it  safe and easy to cut slices of bread, vegetables, and meat into different thicknesses.

 

Toss a salad by shaking in a large covered bowl or container.  It gets well dressed and there is no mess!

 

Safety should never be overlooked, especially in the kitchen!  When working around the stove, avoid wearing anything that might dangle over the burners, such as loose sleeves or ties.

 

Don’t store flammables, especially oven mitts and dish towels, near the stove.

 

Be very familiar with your stove and oven before using.  Know which knobs control which burners.

 

Place your filled pot on the stove burner before turning the burner on.  If you have to place or replace a pot on a burner that is already hot, use a long-handled wooden spoon (which doesn’t conduct heat) to feel around the edge of the pot, ensuring the pot is centered on the burner.

 

Make sure pot handles do not extend over the front or sides of the stove where they can be easily bumped or knocked over.

 

When frying eggs, use an egg ring (available from CNIB).  Grease the ring before placing in the frying pan and drop one egg into each greased ring.  A food turner may be slid under the ring to easily remove the egg from the pan.

 

When frying meat which has to be turned, use a two-sided spatula (available from CNIB), which works like a pair of tongs.  Some people prefer oven baking or roasting meats because they do not have to be turned over.  Bacon, for example, which is very difficult to turn, may be cooked in your oven or microwave.

 

A colander, placed in a sink, provides an easy way to drain water from vegetables, pasta, etc. Pot strainers which attach to the rim of the pot are also excellent for draining water.

 

Explore your oven when cold to                     ensure you are aware of the                            position of the rack(s).

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Talking Measuring Cup, July 2, 2018

July 02, 2018

Meet the talking measuring cup

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the talking measuring cup.

 

Meet the talking measuring cup

 

I have always wanted to find a talking measuring cup and I recently found this online.  I have every intension of buying this but I wanted to share my info with you so that you could go out and see for yourself.  I think that this product will do exactly what I am hoping for.

 

Description

Lifetime Guarantee

This is the measuring cup that verbally announces the volume of wet or dry

ingredients, eliminating the need for cooks to estimate by eye. When set in

its base, the cup states how much has been poured into it in a clear female

voice—1 1/4 cups is spoken as “one and one-fourth cups”. Tare function

lets chefs add multiple ingredients without emptying the cup. The cup can also compensate for items with different densities, such as water, oil, milk, flour, and sugar to ensure recipes are followed precisely. Readings can be stated in volume (cups or milliliters) or weight (ounces or grams). The three

-cup capacity cup is made of unbreakable frosted plastic, has a removable flip-up lid, and is microwave and dishwasher safe for easy use and clean-up. Base wipes clean. Requires two AAA batteries. 6″ H x 7″ W x 5″ D. (1

1/4 lbs.)

The Talking Measuring Cup comes

with The Hammacher Schlemmer Lifetime

Guarantee at no additional charge. If

this product ever disappoints you, for any

reason, you may return it for exchange, credit, or

refund.

Should you have any questions, we are available 24 hours a

day, seven days a week.

Please call 1-800-321-1484 to

speak with a product specialist or email us at

customerservice@hammacher.com to receive a response within one hour.

Item 82370

Price $59.95

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to any of the following libraries.

Recipes – A collection of hard to find recipes

Audio mysteries for all ages – Comfort listening any time of the day

Home and garden – A collection of great articles for around the home and garden

Or you can subscribe to all 3 for the price of $30 annually.

Visit http://www.donnajodhan.com/subscription-libraries.html

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Pouring Liquids, June 25, 2018

June 25

Pouring liquids

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about pouring liquids.

 

When pouring cold liquids use your index finger to position the spout over and in contact with the edge of the glass.  Slowly pour the liquid into the glass using your index finger to gauge the liquid level.  Listen to the change in sound as you pour the liquid.  Also, become familiar with the weight of the empty glass and notice the change as the glass is filled with liquid.

 

Frosted or coloured drinking glasses are much easier to see.

 

When pouring hot liquids put your finger slightly over the edge of the cup and stop pouring as soon as you feel the warmth of the liquid.  Be sure your finger is                         placed away from the direct flow                   of liquid.

 

When pouring hot liquids you may find it easier to place the cup in the sink or on a tray.

 

A liquid level indicator is another alternative when pouring hot liquids.  It is a simple battery operated device with two prongs that hang over the inside edge of the cup and bleeps when the liquid touches the prongs.                                      (Liquid level indicators are                             available from CNIB as well as at other places).

 

Measure water before boiling.  A measuring cup with a spout makes it easier to pour both hot  and cold liquids into other containers.  For example, fill your teapot with cold water and pour it into your kettle, so that you boil exactly the right amount.

 

People who are visually impaired should take advantage of color contrasts!  Pour dark liquids into light-colored containers and light liquids into dark-colored containers.

 

To find the proper place to open a milk carton, locate the seam which runs along one corner edge of the carton from top to bottom.  Always open the carton on the side opposite to the seam.

 

I hope that these tips are helpful to you.

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Talking Thermometer, June 11, 2018

June 18 2018

Meet the talking Thermometer

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the talking thermometer.

 

Meet the talking thermometer

 

There used to be a time when dreaming of having a talking thermometer was just that; just a dream!  No more!  This nifty device has been on the market now for several years and you can find them as either stand alone units or folded into other gadgets.

 

As an example, you may find talking thermometers that also tell you the time.  Mine tells me the time as well as both the indoor and outdoor temperatures.  It tells the time on the hour.

 

Again, it is the best of both worlds.  The advantage of a stand alone unit may be that there are no other add-ons to it; clock, alarm, time, and so on.  The advantage of having it as part of another gadget is that you get other things with it but if that main gadget breaks or stops working then there goes the thermometer along with it.

 

Almost all talking thermometers will give you the temperature in both Farinheight and Celsius versions.

So go out there and make friends with the talking thermometer.

 

Want some contact info?

Here are a few places for you to contact if you are interested to learn more.

CNIB – toll free = 1800 563 2642

Frontier Computing – toll free = 1-888-480-0000

Or visit http://www.futureaids.ca

You can also call them at 1-800-987-1231

There is also no harm in checking out http://www.independentlivingaids.com and

http://www.maxiaids.com

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

 

CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, At The Table, June 11, 2018

June 11 2018

At the table

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about things to consider while at the table.

 

To locate items at your place setting, start at the edge of the table and with your fingers                            curled and arms flexed, move gently toward the centre of the table until you find your plate.  With fingers low to the table, extend arms and fingers gradually to the right and left to find silverware, teacup, glass, salad bowl, bread and butter plate, etc.  Accidents can happen easily, so remember to keep your hands on the surface of the table and move slowly.  If you cannot find the item you need, ask for it to be passed to you.

 

To determine contents on a plate, use the tip of your knife or fork to gently probe the food on the plate, noting the difference in the texture, shape, smell, and location of the food on the plate. Try to determine any special characteristics.  Are there paper containers of relish?  Is the baked potato cut down the middle?  Does it contain any sour cream or is a separate container provided?  Is there finger picking food on the plate?  Does the meat have a “cooking-directions” marker pierced into its middle?  Does the meat have a bone?  Is the decorative salad cut or are there large lettuce leaves?  Is there a separate container of gravy or sauce on the plate?  Such questions are endless, yet each is easily answered by thoroughly checking out the contents with your utensils and determining the characteristics of your food before you start to eat.  As with most people, you will make the occasional mistake or misjudgment.  Laugh it off, learn by it, and go on.  If you are doubtful or need affirmation of your plate’s content, don’t be afraid to ask.

 

A sighted person may describe the location of the various items on the plate. Imagine the plate to be like the face of a clock.  For example, if peas are located at the top of the plate, it is said that the peas are at 12 o’clock.

 

You may find it helpful to turn your plate so that foods that require cutting or special attention, such as meat or corn on the cob, are brought to the bottom of the plate (6 o’clock position).  In this way they are easier to locate and manage without reaching over other foods.

 

“Loose” food such as peas or corn can be difficult to pick up.  Many people use a “pusher” such as a piece of bread, a roll, or a knife to help guide food onto the fork.  Another idea is to gently move the “loose” food, i.e., peas, against a barrier of “solid” food, i.e., mashed potatoes.  This will give you the advantage of being able to get under the “loose” food, as the barrier prevents such food from moving around the plate.

 

While eating, direct the motion of the fork or spoon toward the centre of the plate. Food on the plate should be pushed inward for it tends to move out to the edge of the plate during the normal course of the meal.

 

As you eat, be aware of the weight of the food on your fork or spoon.  With practice and patience, you will soon be able to gauge whether you are lifting an appropriate amount of food.

 

When sprinkling salt from a shaker onto food, sprinkle first into the palm of your hand to determine the amount and how fast the salt is flowing.  This will prevent a fast-flowing shaker from ruining your food.

 

It’s easier to put sticky jam, honey, etc., on your bread if you use a teaspoon to scoop it out of the jar and then use the back of

the spoon (or a knife) to spread                      it.

 

People who are visually impaired should keep colour contrast in mind when setting the table. White plates almost disappear on a white tablecloth but show up well against a plain dark tablecloth. Similarly, if food is dark (such as roast beef), use light dishes and if food is light (fish, cheese, eggs) use dark plates.

 

It is fine to make special requests (ie., to have meat cut or shellfish served out of the shell) when eating away from home.

 

Don’t hesitate to ask for assistance at home or when                                     eating out.

 

I hope that these tips are helpful to you.

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Talking Alarm Clock, June 4, 2018

June 04 2018

Meet the talking alarm clock

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the talking alarm clock.

 

Of course, there are several places where you can buy one of these and I would prefer not to endorse any one in particular but here is the picture.

 

I am always excited whenever someone comes along and improves on an existing product and this is what I have seen in the case of the talking alarm clock.

 

Just imagine!  Now you can find a clock that accepts voice commands!  No more having to press the button to hear the time!  No more having to set the time with buttons!  You now have the best of both worlds!

 

You can either choose to set and hear the time with the press of a button or you can do this through voice commands. Most of these alarm clocks come with extra nice to have add-ons.  Timers, thermometers, date, and more.  You can even choose which voice you want to have announce the time and so on and many of these voices are extremely clear and easy to understand.

 

No more having to depend on sighted assistance to set the time or alarm for me.  No more having to ask someone for the time.

 

So go out there and make friends with the talking alarm clock.

 

Here are a few places for you to contact if you are interested to learn more.

CNIB – toll free = 1800 563 2642

Frontier Computing – toll free = 1-888-480-0000

Or visit http://www.futureaids.ca

You can also call them at 1-800-987-1231

There is also no harm in checking out http://www.independentlivingaids.com and

http://www.maxiaids.com

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Medications, May 28, 2018

May 28 2018

Medications

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about how we deal with medications.

 

If you are taking medication, you may wish to take advantage of the many pill organizers available at drug stores.  Some               have one section for    each day; others are larger and have two or more sections for each day.

These are especially useful for people who take several kinds of pills in the morning, at lunch, at dinner, and            at bedtime.

 

Organize medication according to frequency of use, in alphabetical order, or in categories used.

Large print or braille labels may be placed on medicine bottles to easily identify them.  Any personal marking (for example, a piece of tape) will do the trick as long as it is understandable by you.

When refilling medications, simply transfer the new medicine to the old bottle or ask your pharmacist to use the same container.  If your label will fit on the lid of the bottle, you only need to transfer the lid.

 

“Bubble Packing” service is available from drug stores. The system consists of a weekly supply of medication per card. “Days of the week” are located along the left side of the card and the “time of day” is located across the top of the card. The upper side of the card consists of a series of clear moulded elastic bubbles, containing the pills; the under side is foil. By pushing down on the bubble, and breaking the foil, medications are easily removed into your hand or small glass.                      Since the bubble is crushed by this procedure, it is always easy for a blind or visually impaired person to tactually check to ensure medications have been taken.

 

I hope that these tips are helpful to you.

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, The Talking Watch, May 21, 2018

May 21 2018

Meet the talking watch

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the talking watch.

 

I am a great advocate of the talking watch and it may not be for everyone but for those who do not know Braille and would prefer to hear the time announced out loud; then this is the perfect product for you.

 

The talking watch comes in all sizes and styles.  Several manufacturers have put out their own version of the talking watch.  There are talking watches for the man, talking watches for the lady, and talking watches for the sporty one and even more.

 

The talking watch is what I call a sort of backup device for you to tell the time.  It is portable of course and most talking watches have an alarm set on them.  You would be amazed to learn how this nifty little device can help you to keep up with your schedule.  Sure!  The Apple watch is now here but there is absolutely no reason to ignore the talking watch.

 

So go out there and make friends with the talking watch.

 

Here are a few places for you to contact if you are interested to learn more.

CNIB – toll free = 1800 563 2642

Frontier Computing – toll free = 1-888-480-0000

Or visit http://www.futureaids.ca

You can also call them at 1-800-987-1231

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

May 21 2018

Meet the talking watch

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to talk about the talking watch.

 

I am a great advocate of the talking watch and it may not be for everyone but for those who do not know Braille and would prefer to hear the time announced out loud; then this is the perfect product for you.

 

The talking watch comes in all sizes and styles.  Several manufacturers have put out their own version of the talking watch.  There are talking watches for the man, talking watches for the lady, and talking watches for the sporty one and even more.

 

The talking watch is what I call a sort of backup device for you to tell the time.  It is portable of course and most talking watches have an alarm set on them.  You would be amazed to learn how this nifty little device can help you to keep up with your schedule.  Sure!  The Apple watch is now here but there is absolutely no reason to ignore the talking watch.

 

So go out there and make friends with the talking watch.

 

Here are a few places for you to contact if you are interested to learn more.

CNIB – toll free = 1800 563 2642

Frontier Computing – toll free = 1-888-480-0000

Or visit http://www.futureaids.ca

You can also call them at 1-800-987-1231

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna

 

CCB Tech Articles: Donna’s Low Tech Tips, Bathroom Tips, May 14, 2018

May 14 2018

In the bathroom

 

Hi there!  It’s Donna and thank you for allowing me to come into your inbox.

Today, I’d like to touch on the subject of in the bathroom.

 

If you have a white or light-                           colored bathtub, buy dark colored contrasting soaps. They are easier to locate than white soap, especially if they float.

 

Use soap on a rope or liquid soap dispensers.  They are easy to locate and you avoid the slippery soap problem.

 

A shower caddy (available in department stores and at hardware stores) is useful to hang over your shower head and to hold personal care items such as shampoo and soap.

 

A clear plastic shower curtain allows more light into the shower area than an opaque or solid one.

 

Use your index finger to guide a small amount of toothpaste onto your toothbrush.  If you have your own personal tube of toothpaste, squeeze a small amount directly onto your finger or directly into your mouth. It’s much easier and less messy.

 

I hope that these tips are helpful to you.

 

If you would like to become a member of  my CCB Mysteries chapter you can do so for the price of $10 annually and in return you will receive unlimited access to either of the following libraries.

Recipes –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-recipes.html

Audio mysteries for all ages –

http://www.donnajodhan.com/library-audio-mysteries.html

Or you can subscribe to both for the price of $20 annually.

 

To contact me, send me an email at info@sterlingcreations.ca and I’d be happy to respond.

Have yourselves a great day and see you next week.

Donna