GTT Edmonton Summary Notes, Object Recognition Apps, April 10, 2017

Summary Notes

GTT Edmonton Meeting April 10, 2017

 

The most recent meeting of the Get Together with Technology (GTT) Edmonton Chapter was held April10 at 7pm at Ascension Lutheran Church 8405 83 Street in Edmonton.

14 people attended.

 

April Topic – Object Recognition Apps

Lorne and Russell demonstrated the following iPhone apps that help identify objects.

 

Barcode Scanning

 

SeeWithMe

 

From the iTunes App Store

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/see-with-me/id1118710695?mt=8

Description

 

Blind or visually impaired? This app was developed for you! It allows you to simply move your smartphone over a product’s barcode, and the product name will be read out loud to you. Use it at home or at your grocery store. A connection to the internet (either Wi-Fi or cellular data) is required.

 

Most products from Save-On, Overwaitea and PriceSmart locations may be scanned by this app (excluding items packaged in-store, such as the deli and bakery). We’re working to add more stores soon!

 

Have some personal items at home that you need help identifying (e.g., CDs, medication)? You can print custom barcodes for them too, just visit our website at seewithmeapp.com

Digit-Eyes

From iTunes App Store

https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/digit-eyes/id376424490?mt=8

 

Description

 

Best. Barcode. Reader. Ever! Scan UPC / EAN codes and hear the names of over

37 million products! Make your own QR code labels on the Digit-Eyes website and print them on inexpensive address labels. These barcoded labels may contain text that VoiceOver reads aloud or they can be used to record audio on your iPhone or iPad that is played back whenever the bar code is scanned.

 

Blind? Dyslexic? Having problems reading? Digit-Eyes is for you! With Digit-Eyes, you can

 

– Record your own labels. Visit the Digit-Eyes web site to print specially coded quick-response (QR) digital code labels, apply one to your calendar or a box of leftovers, scan, and record a message. To listen to the recording, just rescan the label. This is how Nancy keeps track of her appointments; how Jeanette labels her canning and how Randy keeps the fridge clean.

 

– Make text-based labels. Visit the Digit-Eyes web site to type up to 250 characters per label, print the specially coded quick-response (QR) barcodes on address labels on your local printer and apply them to your file folders or CDs. To listen to the text, scan it with the Digit-Eyes application on any iPhone or iPad. This is how Will’s secretary labels his folders and how Ana snoops through her friends’ CD collection.

 

– Buy pre-printed washable labels. Sew them into your clothing and record whatever you want to about the garment: color, fabric care or what it should be worn with. Even when the labels have been washed, bleached, sent through the dryer or dry-cleaned, you’ll still be able to scan them with the Digit-Eyes app on your iPhone or iPad and hear what you recorded about the garment.

This is how Davey makes sure he is wearing matching clothing and how Elizabeth can easily sort the laundry.

 

– Use the manufacturer’s product code to find out what the item is.

Digit-Eyes includes a feature that enables you to identify many groceries, CDs, and other consumer goods by scanning the UPC and EAN codes on the products. Just point the camera of your iPhone, Pad or iPod Touch 5g at a package label, scan the code, and wait for Digit-Eyes to call our database and tell you what the item is. This is how Deborah picks out her yarn, how Kevin finds the beef stew, and how both get ready to record their audio labels.

 

– Read standard inventory tags in code 39 or code 128 format. This is how Michael knows which printer is which at work and how Ben does the shelf stocking in his store.

 

– Print labels directly from your iPhone on your Bluetooth-connected printer;

 

– Create and read QR vCard format business card information and add the content to your contacts. This is how Digital Miracles gets information from customers at conferences and how we share our own contact information;

 

– Create lists of code that you’ve scanned; edit them, type additional information and share them with others. This is how Robbie notes what items are getting used up and tells Gary what to buy at the store;

 

– Use Digit-Eyes with any blue-tooth connected laser scanner, integrated as a single unit. This is how John is able to work at a grocery store reading the shelf tags to find where to stock the product.

 

Use of the free Digit-Eyes website comes with the product. The website contains extensive tutorial material designed for users of the iPhone and iPad who are not sighted. The product purchase also includes free online support and tutoring.

 

Digit-Eyes is available in English, Danish, French, German, Italian, Polish, Portuguese, Norwegian, Spanish and Swedish.

 

Digit-Eyes

www.digit-eyes.com/

 

Remote assistance apps

 

Be My Eyes: https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/lifestyle/be-my-eyes-helping-blind-see

Connects to a human helper who can see through your camera to tell you what they see.

 

The following 2 apps Take a picture and within a minute, return a description of what it is by a person, either in text or an audio description or both

 

 

Real Time object recognition

(a computer is doing the object recognition, so it will probably be faster, but perhaps less accurate then the above apps) Aipoly Vision: https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/utilities/aipoly-vision

Third Eye: https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/medical/thirdeye-empowering-blind-and-visually-impaired-object-recognition

Identifi: https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/utilities/identifi-object-recognition-visually-impaired

Talking Goggles:

https://www.applevis.com/apps/ios/productivity/talking-goggles-camera-speech

 

Educational Materials for our Chapter

All e-textbook and audio tutorial training materials have now been purchased and the links to download them have been emailed to those who requested the materials. If you have not received your download link please let us know at

Gtt.edmonton@gmail.com

 

Training

At the April 10 meeting, we also provided basic Victor Reader Stream training to one person.

 

Next Meeting (Monday May 8 at 7pm)

  • As usual, we will provide one-on-one training especially iPhone and DAISY players. If you have other training requests email your interests to us so we can try to accommodate you.
  • As always, for help with technology bring your devices and/or questions to the meeting.

 

Meeting Location and Logistics

  • Ascension Lutheran Church 8405 – 83 Street NW, Edmonton.
  • We meet in the basement hall. There is elevator access.
  • Enter the church from the back door. There is parking at the back and drop off space for taxis, DATS.
  • Meetings are every second Monday of the month at 7pm.
  • If you have someone helping you your assistant is welcome to remain for the meeting.

 

GTT Edmonton Overview

  • GTT Edmonton is a chapter of the Canadian Council of the Blind (CCB).
  • GTT Edmonton promotes a self-help learning experience by holding monthly meetings to assist participants with assistive technology.
  • Each meeting consists of a feature technology topic, questions and answers about technology, and one-on-one training where possible.
  • Participants are encouraged to come to each meeting even if they are not interested in the feature topic because questions on any technology are welcome. The more participants the better able we will be equipped with the talent and experience to help each other.
  • There are GTT groups in Ottawa, Toronto, Kingston, Northern Ontario, Pembroke, Halifax, Sydney, Regina, Calgary, Edmonton, Grande Prairie, Victoria, Nanaimo, Vancouver, and more to come.
  • There is also a national GTT monthly toll free teleconference. You may subscribe to the National GTT blog to get email notices of teleconferences and notes from other GTT chapters. Visit:

http://www.gttprogram.wordpress.com/

There is a form at the bottom of that web page to enter your email.

[End of Document]

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Step-By-Step Resource: How to Rip CDs in Windows 10

How to Rip CDs in Windows 10

 

Related Book

Windows 10 For Dummies

 

By Andy Rathbone.

 

In a process known as ripping, Windows Media Player in Windows 10 can copy your CDs to your PC as MP3 files, the industry standard for digital music.

But until you tell the player that you want MP3 files, it creates WMA files

– a format that won’t play on iPads, most smartphones, nor many other music players.

 

To make Windows Media Player create songs with the more versatile MP3 format instead of WMA, click the Organize button in the top-left corner, choose Options, and click the Rip Music tab. Choose

MP3 instead of WMA from the Format drop-down menu and nudge the audio quality over a tad from 128 to 256 or even 320 for better sound.

 

To copy CDs to your PC’s hard drive, follow these instructions:

 

Open Windows Media Player, insert a music CD, and click the Rip CD button.

 

You may need to push a button on the front or side of your computer’s disc drive to make the tray eject.

 

Windows Media Player connects to the Internet; identifies your CD; and fills in the album’s name, artist, and song titles. Then the program begins copying the CD’s songs to your PC and listing their titles in the Windows Media Player Library.

You’re through.

 

If Windows Media Player can’t find the songs’ titles automatically, however, move ahead to Step 2.

Right-click the first track and choose Find Album Info, if necessary.

 

If Windows Media Player comes up empty-handed, right-click the first track and choose Find Album Info.

 

If you’re connected to the Internet, type the album’s name into the Search box and then click Search. If the Search box finds your album, click its name, choose Next, and click Finish.

 

If you’re not connected to the Internet, or if the Search box comes up empty, right-click the first song, click Edit, and manually fill in the song title.

Repeat for the other titles, as well as the album, artist, genre, and year tags.

 

Here are some tips for ripping CDs to your computer:

 

Normally Windows Media Player copies every song on the CD. To leave Tiny Tim

 

off your ukulele music compilation, however, remove the check mark from Tiny Tim’s name. If Windows Media Player has already copied the song to your PC, feel free to delete it from within Windows Media Player. Click the Library button, right-click the song sung by the offending yodeler, and choose Delete.

 

Windows Media Player automatically places your ripped CDs into your Music folder. You can also find your newly ripped music there as well as in the Windows Media Player Library.

 

end of article.